NodeVsPHP

Node.js or PHP – Which is better?

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In earlier days of web development arena, different technologies were used for front and back-end development. But, with the launch of Node.js, the complete scenario changed as it allowed developers to write the backend code using JavaScript. This eventually gave birth to MEAN stack web development framework use JavaScript right from front-end to backend and even databases (MongoDB -JSON). Before Node.js, the web development was usually done with the help of PHP as it easily integrated with HTML and helped developers to build dynamic websites in no time. In this post, we will compare Node.js VS PHP and see which one best suits the current industry requirements.

The basic difference between PHP and Node.js is that PHP is a programming language and Node.js is a runtime environment based on Chrome’s V8 JavaScript Engine.

We at Alea, use both PHP and Node.js to deliver a robust web solution based on your preferences. We have a talented pool of PHP and Node.js developers working on some cool projects – going to be live soon. Hire them to make your dream project come true and that too without over boarding your budget. Send us your project details at support@aleaitsolutions.com and we will guide you right from the technological aspects of your project to help you make a marketing plan and promotion tactics.

Coming back to Node.js VS PHP, it is a battle which anyone can win as the result is based on the type of website you are developing. Let’s say if you want to build a real-time chat application, then preferring Node.js over PHP is a wiser decision as it can easily handle large client requests at once. But, that doesn’t mean PHP is out of the game, read the full Node.js VS PHP post to know the whole story.

Let’s start:-

1. Performance:
Node.js clearly wins this round because of its event-driven Non-blocking I/O model. Due to this model, Node.js is able to handle large server requests as compared to conventional backend technologies. PHP follows a blocking model in which multiple threads are created on the server side to handle multiple client requests. It results in high server load and response time if the code is not optimized.

2. Hosting and deployment:
PHP applications can run on any server including Nginx and Apache and platforms (Windows and Linux) which makes their deployment process a lot easier task whereas, in case of Node.js, you need a virtual server with SSH access. Therefore, PHP deployment is feasible for smaller corporations and individuals without any knowledge of console commands and Secure Shell (SSH).

3. External dependencies:
Node.js has fewer dependencies. You can set up a web server with just a few lines of code but in order to run PHP applications, you need external server software. Node.js developers just need NPM (Node Package Manager) to find Node modules that they can easily integrate within their applications to provide additional functionalities.

4. CPU extensive tasks:
Node.js might excel in terms of high throughput but that it surely lacks when an app requires heavy CPU extensive tasks. In that case, PHP is best suited for handling the back end of your web application.

5. Single Page Applications:
If you have used Gmail, then probably you know what is a single page application. The web application is loaded at the initial client request and after that only specific portion of the web page is updated as per consequent client requests. Node.js with AngularJS joined forces is the perfect solution for developing single page applications.

6. Environments:
You can use Node.js from desktop app development (Windows, Linux, and Mac), mobile application development (hybrid and cross-platform apps), and even build console-based apps. Though there are workarounds by which you can use PHP to target the specified platforms, but most developers usually don’t use it.

7. Community Support:
As PHP (almost 20 years) is relatively older than Node.js, it is richer in terms of online resources like documentation, FAQs, and codebase. So there are good chances that someone else might have also tried what you are trying to accomplish with your code and take help from it. On the other hand, Node.js has seen large traction from developers and organization, but it has quite a less number of supporting resources to help developers.

8. Learning curve:
Writing Node.js code isn’t easy for newbies and even for JavaScript developers as they first need to understand some complex concepts like web workers and callback functions before getting started. On the other hand, PHP is quite a friendly programming language for beginners in web application development.

The result of Node.js VS PHP battle is a tie as both technologies have their own pros and cons. The scenario is pretty similar when comparing or choosing other technologies for web, desktop, and mobile development. Node.js has promising future and will surely eat a part of PHP’s marketplace, but the 20 years old scripting language can’t be ruled out yet.

Source: Google resources

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Agile vs DevOps

Web Application Security

Agile and DevOps are buzzy theories that many organizations are eager to employ, but there is often some confusion or overlap between the two. Only one business practice originated in software development, though both are being applied to organizational functions beyond software development. They’re not the same, but they’re not enemies.

Using Agile and DevOps in tandem is often the best approach for affecting change within a team, department, or an entire organization. Understanding both theories means being flexible to how they are constantly changing, and realizing that there isn’t one answer to solve all organization needs.

A brief history of software development

Let’s step back a few decades. Starting in the 1950s and 1960s, software development was a relatively new, but rapidly growing, field. Initially, a defined approach for how to develop software didn’t exist, but one organically took the lead: the Waterfall approach. The Waterfall approach holds that developers should first define customer need, and then process through development until they release a single, finished software product that meets the stated need.

It sounded good, but it didn’t always work out. Over time, developers realized that often the customer’s need changed as the development team built software for an outdated purpose. By the time a “finished product” was released to the client, the client needed something different altogether. This mean that both time and money are spent backtracking, reorganizing goals, and throwing out pieces of the development that aren’t needed any longer.

Developers also realized that they were siloed away from other departments that dealt with the customer – there was no “team” approach of working with marketing, designers, or others. This meant that developers were frequently not aware of changes or feedback from the client. This problem, and the Waterfall approach, generally leaves us in the 1990s when developers widely experimented with other approaches.

An agile approach

As software developers realized the immediate drawbacks of heavyweight processes like the Waterfall approach, they looked for approaches that made tweaking software a lot easier and more agile. They also wanted to provide more opportunities for end user feedback, ensuring they were on the right path forward. During the 1990s, many lightweight theories and principles for software development, including the popular Scrum and Kanban methods.

In 2001, the Manifesto for Agile Software Development codified several of these theories and placed them all under the umbrella of Agile software development. Agile software development, shortened to simply ‘Agile’, values the following:

  • People: teammates, customers, and interactions between these people – instead of processes and tools
  • Immediacy: Working software – instead of comprehensive documentation
  • Flexibility: Responding to, and even embracing, change – instead of following a predetermined plan

Agile also destroys the idea of a “finished product”, which was the goal of the Waterfall approach. Instead, Agile believes that software development is iterative and incremental. With each new release of software, the customer can perform new functions or improve upon existing functions.

Agile methodologies encourage developers to break down software development into small pieces known as “user stories”. This highlights the value Agile places on the customer, which helps the developers by providing faster feedback loops and ensuring product alignment with market need. Agile further advocates for adaptive planning, evolving development, early and continuous delivery, and continuous improvement so that developers can rapidly and flexibly respond to change in client needs, software, or other external factors.

The separate world of DevOps

While Agile was a response to waterfall methodologies, DevOps was not a response to Agile. The two theories actually aren’t the same thing – until companies started seeing similarities and increased success and productivity when using them in tandem.

As IT became essential to businesses in the 21st century, two imperative areas emerged: IT Operations (ITOps) and Development Operations (DevOps). Responsibilities of ITOps includes ensuring security, compliance, and reliability, whereas DevOps is responsible for developing and deploying new products to the end-user. While ITOps ensures safety and security for all business needs using the network, DevOps walks a line between flexibility and the rigorous testing and communication that comes with deploying new software.

The merging of Agile and DevOps

In the last decade, companies have begun spinning off a specific DevOps team from their original IT team, or adding Agile approaches within their software development teams. Through these organization changes, several similarities between the two theories emerged.

Agile teams rely on automated build, test automation, Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Delivery (CD). DevOps teams often use all those tools and more, including the addition of configuration management, metrics and monitoring schemes, virtualization, and cloud computing.

For software developers who were frustrated by the shortcomings of a Waterfall approach, Agile felt like a whole new world. But Agile wasn’t perfect either. Common drawbacks to Agile planning include missed deadlines, completed software components that are incompatible with each other due to separated scrums, or teams, and new features breaking old functions – which is a direct result of missed cooperation with DevOps and ITOps. One thing linked all these problems with Agile development: lack of communication.

This is where DevOps begins to fill the gap: DevOps is a theory rooted in communication – both within itself, as the developers and operators have to coordinate, but also across other departments. DevOps frequently communicates with ITOps to ensure secure and stable environments for testing, and their crossover to other teams like marketing and customer service makes sense as they deploy new software.

Proponents of using both theories in appropriate business needs believe that DevOps can be seen as an extension of Agile. Agile relies on cross-functional teams that typically include a designer, a tester, and a developer. DevOps takes this one step further by adding an operations person who can ease the transition from software to deployment. Because of DevOps’ inherent communication with other teams, DevOps can help automate processes and improve transparency for all teams.

Contrasting points

While we are proponents of using Agile and DevOps theories together, it is important to understand where they clearly differ:

  • Speed: Agile is all about rapid and frequent deployment, but this is rarely the goal, or even part of it, for DevOps.
  • Creating vs. Deploying: Developing software is inherent to Agile, but DevOps is concerned with the appropriate deployment of said software. For the record, DevOps can deploy software that was developed in any number of approaches, including Agile and non-Agile theories, like the Waterfall approach, which is still appropriate for certain projects.
  • Specialization: Agile is an equal opportunity team – every member of the scrum can do every job within the team, which prevents slowdowns and bottlenecks. DevOps, on the other hand, assumes separate teams for development and operations, and people stay within their teams, but they all communicate frequently.
  • Communication and documentation: Daily, informal meetings are at the heart of Agile approaches, so each team member can share progress, daily goals, and indicate help when needed. These scrums are not meant to go over documentation or milestones and metrics. DevOps meeting are not daily, but they require a lot of documentation in order to communicate software deployment to all relevant teams.
  • Documentation: Agile teams don’t codify their meeting minutes or other communications – often preferring lo-fi methods of simple pen and paper. DevOps, on the other hand, requires design documents and specs in order to fully understand a software release.
  • Team size: Staying small is at the core of Agile – the smaller the team, the fewer people on it, the faster they can move, even if they are contributing to a larger effort. DevOps, on the other hand, will have many teams that work together and each team can realistically practice different theories.
  • Scheduling: Agile teams work in short, predetermined amounts of time, known as sprints. Sprints rarely last longer than a month, and often can be as short as a week. DevOps, on the other hand, values maximum reliability, so they focus on a long-term schedule that minimizes business disruptions.
  • Automation: This is the heart of DevOps, as their overall goal is to minimize disruptions and maximize efficiency, especially when deploying software. Agile doesn’t require automation.

These stark differences remind us that Agile and DevOps, at their roots, are not the same.

Culture of Agile and DevOps

While Agile does not necessarily lead to DevOps, both can have profound culture shifts within an organization.

An Agile approach encourages a change in how we think about development. Instead of thinking of development as a large, difficult think, Agile thinking promotes small, manageable changes quickly that over time lead to larger changes. Companies of all sizes have experimented with how working in an Agile way can boost many departments, and today some enterprises even consider themselves fully Agile.

DevOps can also bring its own cultural shifts within an organization, including enhanced communication, and balancing stability with change and flexibility.

Choosing to use both theories is an active decision that many industry experts believe can lead to more rational decision making, thus improving the company culture.

DevOps methodology was born out of this need for better collaboration and faster delivery. DevOps enables continuous software delivery with less complex problems to fix and faster resolution of problems.

Conclusion: Agile is a set of values and principles about how to produce i.e. develop software. Example: if you have some ideas and you want to turn those ideas into working software, you can use the Agile values and principles as a way to do that. But, that software might only be working on a developer’s laptop or in a test environment. You want a way to quickly, easily and repeatably move that software into production infrastructure, in a safe and simple way. To do that you need DevOps tools and techniques.

Agile software development methodology focuses on the development of software but DevOps on the other hand is responsible for development as well as deployment of the software in the safest and most reliable way possible.

In order to understand the difference, we should look shortly into pre-Agile era, especially the Waterfall model, and how Agile differs from it. Then it is easier to understand the differences between Agile and Devops.

In the Waterfall model, you first define the outcome according to customer needs, and then the development process runs until a “finished” product is released. The biggest problem with this approach is that the customer’s needs usually change during the development phase. Thus, you end up delivering software that doesn’t meet the revised needs, or you spend a lot of time and money in changing plans midway.

The next step in the evolution is the Agile model. The idea in Agile is to develop software in small iterations and be thus able to adapt to the changing customer needs better than in Waterfall. However, this model has its hitches as well, such as 1) the budget goals and deadlines are often missed, 2) completed software components are not compatible which each other, and 3) new features break old functions. Furthermore, there is no or only a little cooperation between development and IT operations crew. The notorious silos are still intact!

DevOps brings more flexibility on top of the Agile model. With continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) pipelines, you can make sure that you can release often and the releases actually work and meet the customer needs. Cooperation between the development team and IT operations ensures that also the used tools are streamlined and do not form bottlenecks. With the effective tools, repetitive work can be automated and transparency is improved. Thus all the involved parties have comprehensive visibility into the project.

Agile v/s DevOps – Can they both be clubbed together!

Agile is a set of values and principles about how to produce i.e. develop software. Example: if you have some ideas and you want to turn those ideas into working software, you can use the Agile values and principles as a way to do that. But, that software might only be working on a developer’s laptop or in a test environment. You want a way to quickly, easily and repeatably move that software into production infrastructure, in a safe and simple way. To do that you need DevOps tools and techniques.

DevOps methodology was born out of this need for better collaboration and faster delivery. DevOps enables continuous software delivery with less complex problems to fix and faster resolution of problems. In order to understand the difference, we should look shortly into pre-Agile era, especially the Waterfall model, and how Agile differs from it. Then it is easier to understand the differences between Agile and Devops.

In the Waterfall model, you first define the outcome according to customer needs, and then the development process runs until a “finished” product is released. The biggest problem with this approach is that the customer’s needs usually change during the development phase. Thus, you end up delivering software that doesn’t meet the revised needs, or you spend a lot of time and money in changing plans midway.

The next step in the evolution is the Agile model. The idea in Agile is to develop software in small iterations and be thus able to adapt to the changing customer needs better than in Waterfall. However, this model has its hitches as well, such as 1) the budget goals and deadlines are often missed, 2) completed software components are not compatible which each other, and 3) new features break old functions. Furthermore, there is no or only a little cooperation between development and IT operations crew. The notorious silos are still intact!

DevOps brings more flexibility on top of the Agile model. With continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) pipelines, you can make sure that you can release often and the releases actually work and meet the customer needs. Cooperation between the development team and IT operations ensures that also the used tools are streamlined and do not form bottlenecks. With the effective tools, repetitive work can be automated and transparency is improved. Thus all the involved parties have comprehensive visibility into the project.

website_promotion_banner

Successful Tips and Tricks For Website Promotions

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Website Promotion is a challenging process. You can have the best product in the world, but without effective advertising no one will know about it. Just because you have launched your website on the Internet doesn’t mean that everyone will come flocking to it. In fact, nobody will know it exists if you do not get out there and promote it. There are some successful tips and Tricks which will definitely increase traffic of your website :

  1. Strong Content Writing – Being a crucial part of the website it should be strong enough to catch the attention of the readers. It should stand out as the best in the niche and be worthy to rank high in Google. Uncomplicated and Impressive content gets more social media shares and earns backlinks from authoritative domains which automatically leads to increase more traffic to your website. It’s also important to interact with your readers and ask them to participate to the article by leaving comments.
  2. Build quality backlinks – To get more organic traffic, you have to build backlinks to get the better results. Only spend time on building quality backlinks and never replicate all of them. Bad backlinks can lead to Google penalties.
  3. Don’t replace your best backlinks –When you earn or build some good backlinks, it’s very important not to lose them. Keeping track of your existing backlinks is at least as important as building them.
  4. Share your Case studies – To keep the reader’s interest alive & give them a reason to re-visit your website you should share your experiences and tell your readers how you achieved certain results. It will help you to drive organic traffic to your websites.
  5. Interesting & Awesome Headlines – An Interesting headline can improve your CTR on search engines and social media & help you to get listed on the top.
  6. Be creative with your photos – An impressive image will not only look good on your website, but it can also help you get backlinks which can help to attract traffic to your website. If your image is unique, others might want to use it on their website, and they’ll link to your website as being the source.
  7. Assemble email addresses – Nowadays an email is the most personal way to communicate with your readers and tell them about your latest posts or ask for their feedback. Grabbing your visitors email addresses will help you increase your returning rate and decrease the bounce rate
  8. Focusing on Your Customers –Run surveys to understand what readers expect from you. It’s makes you to understand what your readers expect from your website and how they think you can improve the website. Your readers feedback is very important, and it can help you build your website in the right direction.

These eight website promotion tips make it easy for anyone to focus on improving their website, and promoting it through the right channels. It can take a few weeks, or months, before you notice a significant increase in traffic and your online ranking.

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Proximity Marketing – The new era of mobile marketing

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With mobile devices becoming a staple of modern society and the preferred way of accessing digital content, today’s successful marketing professionals will need to understand how to connect successfully with mobile consumers. Smartphones have made proximity the most popular consumer technology. With reports of smartphone users skyrocketing and expecting to reach a staggering number of 2.5 billion in 2019, Proximity undoubtedly makes for the strongest and most compelling marketing strategy for enterprises to reach out to its digitally connected customers.
Over 19 industry verticals are investing in and deploying proximity technologies with the top five being Retail, Shopping Malls, Hotels & Tourism, Stadiums & Sports and Airport. Retail, in particular, has been more aggressive in deploying the latest location-based marketing strategy and investing in proximity platforms.
Proximity marketing uses location-based technologies such as Beacon, Wi-Fi, Geo-fencing, GPS, and Near Field Communication (NFC) to engage customers directly through their mobile devices. One of the key benefits of proximity marketing is that its messages reach a high percentage of potential customers who are in the area.
Few Proximity Marketing Strategies are:

  • On-the-Spot Digital Coupons: This strategy allows retailers to send digital coupons to all of the shoppers that are in proximity to their store via the Bluetooth or WiFi network. It can be a powerful tool to capitalize on high-traffic times, test out interest in a new product, or stimulate sales on a slow day.
  • Interactive Digital Signage: Eye-catching digital signs, while not having the penetration power of a digital message sent to all mobile phones in proximity, can still be highly effective in engaging customers. A digital kiosk outside a movie theater, for instance, can allow customers to browse their choices and watch previews based on their own individual tastes and preferences.
  • Bar Code Marketing: One of the latest advancements in proximity marketing is the bar code. Similar to what is used as price tags at grocery stores; companies have now taken to using a simple bar code (sometimes called QR codes) as a way to connect with customers. Again, this strategy is somewhat passive, in that passersby need to choose to scan the bar code with their smartphone, but it requires less time and attention than digital signage. Shoppers can scan on the fly and connect with the content on the spot or bookmark it and come back to it later.
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How Big Data and Analytics are Transforming Businesses?

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As the businesses on Internet is expanded, the volume of data now being generated is huge and making the sense out of that massive raw data is beneficial.

Analysts predict that by the year 2020 organizations will house 4.4 zettabytes – or 44 trillion megabytes – of information.

As the businesses embraces doing business on Internet, Big Data is now a new crush for all small, medium and large organisations.

What is Big Data Analytics?

Big data analytics – tools and processes created specifically to turn big data and analytics into business insight – allow business leaders to develop a conversational relationship with data. It’s an approach where answers suggest better questions and refinement leads to insight.

There are various ways to unlock value from Big Data:

  • Time Is Value
    Getting real time analytics helps in improving organisation and taking quick better decisions toward improvements which in turn gain better value in long term.
    Once we have the real-time insights, decision making processes are able to realize better value from real time analytics.
  • Streamlining Decision Making
    Many organisations have different culture, mindsets, business models, processes, innovators who help organisations in making decisions and implementing those, now with the Big Data when they analyse the information they could realize that they can now understand what their customers really want and they know that they are far from achieving that goal, further which helps them in implementing the process and models in different way to achieve the goals.

    Organizations that streamline their decision-making processes to become agile and responsive can best survive in the face of constant digital disruption.

  • Deeper Consumer Perception
    Organisations are now improving customer relations using big data. They can now identify from which customer they are generating good revenue clearing the fact that a single client is giving the small amount in chunks but combining that shows large revenue.
  • Increased Human Capital
    Employee retention is a normal business concern for some industries. An IBM case study reveals that one company reviewed around 5,000 applications and hired 200 new employees each month. Big data analytics allowed the business to analyze longtime employees’ histories to discover what job traits identify long-term job prospects. As a result, the company revamped their hiring process, greatly reducing worker turnover.
    By improving employee retention, organisation improves service level and the newly available resources become more productive.

We are just at the beginning of a revolution that will touch every business and every life on this planet. But loads of people are still treating the concept of big data as something they can choose to ignore.

Are you ready to improve?

Sources:

http://projectmgmt.brandeis.edu/resources/articles/how-big-data-and-analytics-are-transforming-business/
https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2015/09/30/big-data-20-mind-boggling-facts-everyone-must-read/#62f36dab17b1

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